1880’s – In the News

 1880’s – Yelm in the News & Other Useful Information

1881 – Twenty children attended class in a one room log cabin school, purchased from Thomas McClain Chambers.  Their teacher was Mr. Dolby for a school term.  (YP)

1888 – Business News

James Longmire, capitalist

Robert Longmire, general store

P. B. Van Trump, general store and hotel

 [untitled]

Washington Standard   February 8, 1889 

Messrs. J. B. Jonis, R. H. Kandle and S.S. Lawrence, of Yelm, were in town this week transacting school business before the County Commissioners.

 

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Washington Standard    February 22, 1889 

 

Messrs. John Algyer and John Montgomery, of Yelm, visited Olympia this week on district school business before the superintendent. 

Jacob Stone Probate

Introduction:  Jacob Stone lived southeast of the town of Yelm.  The following information is taken from his probate record. 

Shopping at the Robert Longmire Store

(money owed by Stone)

Five visits in October 1887 – April 1889, 74 visits to the store, average nearly four times month

Beginning Balance of $29.74

October $34.64

November-December $20.80

January – $17.64

February   $5.25

March – $17.42

April – $23.90

May to August – $131.37, Paid – $1.45 on dry goods

September (1887) -$37.99, $20 paid toward account

Paid – December 28, 1888-$9.00, January 4, 1889-$6.00, another time $2.00

$20 interest charge = $422.96

$316 debt, paid $21.45, bought $286, paid $21.45

Total indebtedness = $422.96

The following is a list of the types of (though not quantities) of items purchased on Jacob Stone’s account at the Longmire store in Yelm


Maintenance/Farm

lumber

bolt

ax handle

rope

axle grease

wagon

file

Clothing

boots

overalls

gloves  (it was winter)

overalls

pants

shirt

denims

drawers

socks

cheviot

hose

hat

muslin

lace

white shirt

ladies shoes

 

Sundries

thread

coal oil

tobacco

books

whetstone

skillet

fork

soap

broom

matches

oil cloth

tacks

shot

salt petre

castor oil

powder

tinware

bucket

Food

flour

sugar

rice

baking powder

coffee

vinegar

bacon

beans

sirup [sic]

tea

cornstarch

oat flakes, rolled oats

lard

pepper

soda

apples

peaches

bran

butter

Household

lamp

lantern

candles

1890

corset

washboard

Jamaican ginger

Miscellaneous Financial

Sold his personal property $486.35

Seems to have leased land for people to run their horses on

Sold J. C. Conine hay

Amos Miles rented land from him

Borrowed $500 from James Longmire in 1887

Had borrowed money from Theresa Riell

Land

South half of sw qtr, section 10

North half of section 15, twp 16 north, range east 2 = $2500

January 11, 1889 – doctor visit

Died January 12, 1889 

Property For Sale at Auction

10 cows

2 three year old cattle

1 bull

6 two year old cattle

7 calves

1 wagon

1 set harnesses

3 plows

2 work horses

1 scrapred?

1 joint harrow

1 revolving hay rack

½ interest in dick harrow

1 mower

1 hay knife

1 mowing scythe

1 grain cradle

3 pitch forks

2 shovels

1 hay press

1 pair of scales

2 barrels

1 crosscut saw

1 log chain

1 crowbar

1 barking iron

2 hand rakes

1 kit of horse shoeing tools

1 drawing knife

2 augers

1 brush scythe

1 brace & bits

1 pick

1 stove

1 clock

1 tub

dishes

17 milk pans

1 churn

1 table

2 lamps

3 lanterns

1 dish fran?

Bailing rope

6 seamless jacks

3 hogs

2 dozen chicken

County Commissioners 

Washington Standard   April 26, 1889 

 

Yelm – J. A. McKenzie and P. Van Trump, Judges and John Allen Inspector.

 

[untitled]

Washington Standard    May 3, 1889 

Mrs. Lou Jackson Longmire, of Yelm Prairie, will please accept the thanks of the OLYMPIAN for a beautiful bouquet of choice pansies. They are the largest ever seen here and are a convincing argument of the capabilities of Yelm Prairie soil.

It is reported that Yelm creek is almost dry, and the like had not been known the past twenty years.

Democratic Convention

Washington Standard    May 10, 1889 

 

Representative Democrats from the different precincts of this county, and from the precinct of Centralia, in Lewis County, met at Columbia Hall Wednesday afternoon at 1 o’clock and transacted the following business:

The Convention was called to order by John Miller Murphy, who placed in nomination E. T. Young, for chairman of the Convention. D. L. Ward elected secretary and J. A. Taylor, of Centralia assistant secretary.

On motion, J. B. Landrum, John Miller Murphy, and P. B. Van Trump were appointed a committee on credentials and submitted the following report which was adopted:

Yelm- P. B. Van Trump and Thos. Chambers by Van Trump, proxy.

[untitled]

Washington Standard   June 7, 1889

The hoodoo Indian doctor, from Yelm Prairie, who received a wound in the wrist sometime ago, is in town. The death of an Indian girl was attributed, by her father, to the hoodooing of the doctor. To avenge her death, the father attempted to kill the doctor, but only shot him through the wrist.

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Washington Standard    June 16, 1889

Several Indians are in the city today to attend District Court, as witnesses in the case of the shooting of the Indian doctor.

Mr. James Longmire is in the city, and brings his usual budget of good cheer from the southwestern portion of the county.

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Washington Standard    June 23, 1889

 

The blackberries that have been brought into Olympia from the neighboring woods since the season commenced would load a freight car.

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Washington Standard    July 5, 1889

Logging camps have generally shut down in vicinity of Olympia and loggers are coming into town to have a good time.

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Washington Standard    August 8, 1889

Mr. Henry Kandle, one of the pioneers of our Territory, now a resident of Pierce county, is on a visit to the Capital city.

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Washington Standard    August 9, 1889

It is reported that Yelm creek is almost dry, and the like had not been known the past twenty years.

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Washington Standard    August 9, 1889

The house of Mr. Ed. Norman, at Yelm, was destroyed by fire, on the 30th ult., with all its contents. It caught from a forest fire while the owner was absent.

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Washington Standard    August 9, 1889

Willow Lawn school house, in this county, was destroyed by fire, last Tuesday. Fires are raging in every direction and great damage will be done if it does not rain soon.

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Washington Standard    August 16, 1889

Mr. James Longmire, of Yelm, called on the OLYMPIAN, today, and stated that the report published some days ago of the robbery of his son, at that place, was inaccurate in several particulars. The store was entered at night, and the safe opened and $1,000 taken from there. Nobody was assaulted, and the safe was opened without violence, although Mr. Robert Longmire is sure that it was locked on combination when the store was closed for the night. Two men, who had been at Yelm that day, and who bought tickets for Portland at Media next morning have not yet been apprehended.

Longmire’s health resort, the medical springs at the headwaters of the Nisqually, are beginning to attract considerable attention, and there is an average attendance of twenty-five guests, at this season of the year. The springs are situated about sixty-eight miles from this city, and are reached from Yelm by horses over a good trail.

 

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Washington Standard    August 16, 1889

A collision occurred on the Northern Pacific railroad at Yelm station a few days ago, between a freight and a coal train, which resulted in the destruction of several cars and much damage to the locomotives.

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Washington Standard    August 30, 1889

 

Miss Margie Ross, of Eastside, will close her second term of school at Yelm next week, and then resume her studies at one of the schools in this city.

1890 – Shore and O”Dell sawmill (later Shore Shingle Mill (lst in area) built on the Nisqually River.  (YP)

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